If “You Can’t Cheat An Honest Man,”Whence Come Our Political Candidates?

W.C. FieldsWe admit our confusion. Both Dems and GOP leaders demand open borders and admission of aliens, legally or otherwise. The resulting floods, in reaction to the conditions that they have fled, are glad to work both harder and cheaper than the Americans who now demand a $15 hr. minimum wage. Result: Between aliens and robots, the percentage of qualified Americans now actually working has slid back down to match the numbers from yesteryear, when unemployed housewives were the norm.

The same politicians ‘helping’ workers by boosting wages at government gunpoint are the ones importing the foreigners to compete with the workers that they claim to be helping. What is remarkable is the mass failure of U.S. voters who do the math. Instead, they continue returning said politicians to their sinecures. (Suckers!) Perhaps this relates to the way our politicians, while they complain of public education, never actually change it.

It is also notable that few take Christianity (or Judaism) seriously anymore, so the related moral behavior is abandoned. Most recognize that no politician should be trusted but few seem to have extended the analysis to news media, pundits, climate scientists, school teachers and businespeople, though the evidence seems incontrovertible. A large number still accept government statistics on employment, inflation and the cost of living even though their own daily experience gives them the lie.

If we call up a “corruption world map” we will note that the corruption levels world wide are inversely proportioned to the relative prosperity. The most corrupt places are also the poorest. (Excepting the politically powerful). Nevertheless, we proceed with the trading away of historical morality for political promises that so far in history, have never been fulfilled. Slow learners. “This time is different” always seems to find susceptible targets.

We recall the 1939 W.C. Fields film: “You Can’t Cheat An Honest Man.” Were our species honest, we wouldn’t need churches, right? Or governments, for that matter. We note that our species tends to tire of the restrictions imposed by churches while politicians merely adapt to that, offering duly adjusted baits. Churches have trouble matching that flexibility, since their truths were handed to them from on high. Though at present, a socialist Pope seems to be doing his best. He is of course trying to save the relevancy of his church; we wish him will but retain our doubts.

If, as our grandmother said, “You can’t make a silk purse from a sow’s ear,” we must assume that the present trend toward declining standards of living are tied to the presently declining morality -honesty- of Western societies. You get what you pay for; for prosperous societies, you have to pay by giving up opportunities to take unfair advantage of others. Our prosperity hasn’t been free.

So, as we return toward “every man for himself” values, we will gain the related short term advantages … at the cost of the far greater long term costs of a disintegrating civil society subject ot unsafe public places and unreliable transactions. Plus naturally, the deceptive political promises we have chosen to rely upon as we proceed. W.C. Fields wrote the truth; we are not dheated because we are honest and our politicians areen’t. Or so it seems to us.

 

 

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About Jack Curtis

Suspicious of government, doubtful of economics, fond of figure skating (but the off-ice part, not so much)
This entry was posted in Economics, Goverrnment, Politics, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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