Islamic Jihad In Unexpected Places … (The Internet Isn’t Free)

Islam Attacks!

Islam Attacks!

The young American/Kuwaiti who shot 4 marines dead recently is occupying a lot of TV and news space. It helps distract from Iran nuclear deals and the dying E.U. financial system, we suppose. Those are important to the world and frighten politicians who prefer to forget them if they can. A young Moslem surrounded by dead U.S. Marines makes a good cover.

Much of the TV dialogue seems to us inane at best. Or political propaganda. These are our thoughts on Islam, especially in America. Readers are welcome to differ; we are no experts. But there seem to be some basic points that require no expertise.

Islam is a seventh century product, designed for sensibilities of that time. It has changed little, once settled. It is much more than a religion, prescribing life and law for the faithful in detail. It includes a duty to convert the world to its beliefs.It is at bottom intolerant, abiding non-Moslems only as it must.

Throughout its history, in peace and in war, it has been a source of violent terrorism by is more fundamentalist adherents. These flare-ups have tended to come, receive large initial support, eventually murder and maim too many fellow Moslems and lose support, then fade for a while. Until the cycle repeats.

Some numbers: Pew Research found some 2.7 million U.S. Moslems in 2013 and estimated their doubling by 2030. By 2050 they are expected to reach some 2.1% of the population. Europe has a much larger issue to deal with. In America, the question is whether to study Spanish, not the Koran.

Presently, the Internet is expanding the ability of Islamists to export terrorism; they can reach disaffected youth planet wide at low cost. Such contagion spreads quickly and cheaply to wreak mayhem even without any other actions by the original terrorists. That sort of electronic Jihad is growing, everywhere.

That is the real threat from ISIS, not its Iraqi Sunni attempt to restore Sunni power after the Shia were handed Iraq by the U.S. Unsurprisingly, support for ISIS is declining heavily in Iraq and Syria; the Saudis and Iranians are even cooperating against it. But its ability to trigger young, disaffect and ignorant foreigners in other places will only decline when it is visibly demolished. Until then, Moslem mayhem against innocents will continue spreading via the worlds’ electronic interconnections. Note that some of these solo gunmen types are not Moslems, they murder for other reasons. Such nuts are always among us. Now, they can be used by Islamists.

After ISIS is defunct, Boko Haram, Abu Sayaf and their descendants will repeat the pattern wherever there are significant numbers of Moslems and given the Internet, even places where they are few.

Politicians in Europe and America wish to use Islam against their local Christians, likely in the end, a knife without a handle. In Europe, Moslems seem to be merging into the larger migration problem from Africa. In the U.S. the media are overstating the case for its headline value, but inadvertently demonizing Moslems in the process.

Large scale Moslem manyhem will follow large Moslem populations as it historically has done. It will wax and wane, but never stop. Smaller scale murders of innocents will expand to wherever there are any Moslems with an Internet connection.

Post-Christian societies are proving more dangerous places than were their predecessors. Internet Jihad is just one more risk for them. Get used to it …

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About Jack Curtis

Suspicious of government, doubtful of economics, fond of figure skating (but the off-ice part, not so much)
This entry was posted in History, Islam, Terrorism and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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